Fuck No Rape Apologists

(TRIGGER WARNING FOR THE ENTIRE BLOG) Just another blog dedicated to calling out rape apologists and victim blamers on their myths (i.e. men can't be raped, women can't be rapists, it isn't rape if they're drunk, ect). This is a place to share your stories and experiences with rape culture, no matter your gender, race, religion, or sexuality.
All messages from apologists will be public. If you're sharing a story, please specify if you'd like to stay anonymous. If you're giving any words of encouragement or asking a question not on anon, one of us will respond on our main blogs. email: 

fcknorapeapologists@gmail.com (no U!!!)

loriadorable:

circuitbird:

This is a very important website. Please spread the link.

Hey sex workers!

(via smitethepatriarchy)

heidiweinburg:

egoting:

Some pictures from the rally today at Columbia. So much wonderful support for my sister and I! Emma and I are truly grateful to everyone who came, and everyone who was there in spirit.

This honestly makes me so emotional.

(via amovible)

She cries inside when she hears a man
yell, “I just RAPED you!” when he wins
a video game. No one knows what happened
to her when she was just seven years old, she
grew in a thrust that night, because a piece of her
womanhood was taken at an early age.
It’s ten years later and she still shakes
when someone touches her skin. But,
she won’t tell, she keeps it within.

He bites his lips, fighting back tears,
as his friend says, “Guys who are raped,
are just too weak to fight back.”
So he should never tell a single soul,
what happened when his dad was
drunk that night, and he was too
small and scared to win the fight.

They will make up the excuses that
she was “drunk!” and “Did you see what
she was wearing? Her ass was hanging
out, she was asking for it!” They will say,
“boys will be boys.” And the word rape will
be used in society to describe the
dominance of winning someone
in a game of Call of Duty. If you tell me
there’s no Rape Culture, then tell me
why victims are too afraid to speak
up?

i.c. "He told me there was no Rape Culture."  (via delicatepoetry)

(via etortumlu)

thebaddestfemaleradfem:

huntyqueen:

Today one of my friends was dress coded for her bra strap showing and so she wrote on the gym shirt that they gave her. It reads “Dress Code: promotes the objectification and sexualization of young bodies, blames the wearer for the onlooker’s perceptions/actions, perpetuates rape culture, and is bullshit” On the back she wrote “You can’t shame me for something I’m not ashamed for”. It was really cool seeing all of the people’s reactions who saw it and I thought what she did was pretty cool.

YES YOUNG WOMEN STANDING UP FOR THEMSELVES

ENDLESS APPLAUSE

(via denofhay)

vayena:

from facebook:

stephen wood is a pedophile, sexual predator and giant transphobe, i highly suggest you unfriend/block him immediately.

he has sent unsolicited nudes to a friend of mine who is UNDER FOURTEEN YEARS OLD and has even told them that he would like to have sex with…

(via whitegirlsaintshit)

micdotcom:

19 #WhyIStayed tweets everyone needs to see

While many cheered the NFL’s move to (finally) punish Rice’s vicious behavior, too many media outlets immediately fell into a tired pattern of victim blaming. 

Writer Beverly Gooden had heard enough. “I was watching the responses to the TMZ on my timeline, and I noticed a trend. People were asking ‘why did she marry him?’ and ‘why didn’t she leave him,’” Gooden told Mic. “When I saw those tweets, my first reaction was shame. The same shame that I felt back when I was in a violent marriage. It’s a sort of guilt that would make me crawl into a shell and remain silent. But today, for a reason I can’t explain, I’d had enough. I knew I had an answer to everyone’s question of why victims of violence stay. I can’t speak for Janay Rice, I can only speak for me.”

Gooden decided to change the conversation. Follow micdotcom

(via now-i-only-want-you-gone)

maarnayeri:

If your primary thought after hearing of a woman being physically abused by her partner is to insist on playing devil’s advocate or justify the situation by stating it must have been the result of provocation, you’re a misogynist.

(via thesexuneducated)

washuta:

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The body of 15-year-old Tina Fontaine, a member of Sagkeeng First Nation, was pulled from the Red River in Winnipeg on August 17.  Her murder has brought about an important conversation about the widespread violence against First Nations women and the Canadian government’s lack of concern.

In her August 20 Globe and Mail commentary, Dr. Sarah Hunt of the Kwagiulth band of the Kwakwaka’wakw First Nation wrote about the limited success of government inquiries and her concerns about other measures taken in reaction to acts of violence already committed, such as the establishment of DNA databases for missing persons. Dr. Hunt writes:

Surely tracking indigenous girls’ DNA so they can be identified after they die is not the starting point for justice. Indigenous women want to matter before we go missing. We want our lives to matter as much as our deaths; our stake in the present political struggle for indigenous resurgence is as vital as the future.”

Violence against indigenous women is not, of course, happening only in Canada. In the U.S., for example, the Justice Department reports that one in three American Indian women have been raped or experienced an attempted rape, and the rate of sexual assault against American Indian women is more than twice the national average. This violence is not taking place only in Indian Country.

In the Globe and Mail on August 22, Elizabeth Renzetti wrote about three recent murders of First Nations women. “What unites these three cases is that the victims – Tina Fontaine, Samantha Paul and Loretta Saunders – were all aboriginal women. What else unites them, besides the abysmal circumstances of their deaths? What economic, cultural, historical or social factors? Anything? Nothing?”

image

I can’t answer that, but I know that all of these women—and every other indigenous woman in Canada and the U.S.—lives in a society that includes images of violence against indigenous women in its entertainment products. Over and over, violence against indigenous women is made to titillate, built into narratives along with action, suspense, swashbuckling, and romance. Indigenous women become exotic props, and when we are identified with these dehumanized caricatures, it becomes easier to treat us inhumanely.

image

Take as an example Disney’s Pocahontas. Released in 1995, the cartoon feature has replaced the historical figure’s life story in the minds of many Americans. Much has been made of Disney’s exotification of Pocahontas. John Smith is only compelled to put down his gun because of her beauty. Pocahontas is imbued with animal qualities throughout the film as she scuttles, bounds, swims, creeps, and dives. This reinforces a long-held conception of Native peoples as being “close to nature” at best, “more animal than human” at worst—and the latter is a view that makes us easier to abuse.

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 The recent depiction of Emily (a Makah woman) in the Twilight series offers viewers a direct representation of violence in a fictional Native community. Emily’s broad, visible facial scar is said to be the result of her partner Sam’s (a Quileute man/werewolf) outburst of rage: he was a younger werewolf, with difficulty controlling his “phasing” from human to wolf, he became angry, and she was standing too close. The presentation of this story problematic in its shrugging absolution of Sam of his responsibility in maiming Emily, and the aftermath is heartbreaking: in the more detailed version of the story presented in the Twilight books, after Sam mauls Emily, she not only takes him back, but convinces him to forgive himself. This sends the message that an episode of violence can and should be overlooked for the sake of romance. Emily, a Native woman, becomes expendable. Her safety is of little concern; the fact that Sam has “imprinted” on her, cementing his attachment, is more important than the reality of recidivism.

In a Globe and Mail editorial, “How to Stop an Epidemic of Native Deaths,” the author brings up the many social factors at work in the epidemic of violence against Native women. I bring up the problematic and pervasive imagery above not because I think it is the most problematic issue, but because it is what I know, and because we can start solving it with our individual actions. We don’t need to call Native women “squaws” and joke that they were “hookers” when forced into prostitution, as Drunk History did last year. We can make better choices than “naughty Native” costumes on Halloween. We have the freedom to choose the representations we make in the world, and when we perpetuate damaging stereotypes of indigenous women as rapeable, we are using our autonomy to disempower others.

Karen Warren wrote in “A feminist philosophical perspective on ecofeminist spiritualities”:

"Dysfunctional systems are often maintained through systematic denial, a failure or inability to see the reality of a situation. This denial need not be conscious, intentional, or malicious; it only needs to be pervasive to be effective."

image

I’m tired of hearing that these images aren’t harmful. I’d rather see how much they’re missed when they’re gone than continue to listen to the insistence that the image of Pocahontas at the end of a gun barrel is wholesome while, every day, more and more indigenous women die while we are told that this is not a phenomenon, not a problem, nothing more than crime.

(via angrywocunited)

seawitchintraining:

Seriously like two days ago Cee-Lo Green admitted to drugging and raping a woman in 2012. He deleted his twitter account because hes admitted hes guilty and that he doesnt think raping that woman was wrong bc he drugged her first WHY IS NO ONE TALKING ABOUT THIS.

(via keychainlizard)